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Eidé’s Suitable Man Event

The Suitable Man

The Suitable Man

The lights were hung bright, the Candoni Wine was flowing and the men were all adorned in suits. The décor included vintage suitcases laid open with Trio Tailoring’s men’s apparel and Eidé accoutrements all to honor Atlanta’s most fashionable men and women.

After weeks of preparation, the Suitable Man event came together on Thursday, October 25 at Park Tavern in Piedmont Park. With over 200 guests in attendance and all of them dressed to the nines, the event featured Candoni Wines, Michael Collins Whiskey, Frozen Pints gourmet ice cream (craft beer ice cream) and two entirely electric luxury cars by Fisker. Guests had the option of receiving a complimentary roundtrip ride to the event thanks to Uber car’s new locale in Atlanta.

Trio Tailoring presented the event and the Five Suitable Men featured in Eidé’s Genius Issue were all in attendance looking as dapper as ever in their suits. The five suitable men were David Courtright—musician/poet; E. Vincent Martinez—Fashion and style blogger of StyleMagVM; Jarrod Levine; General manager at Whiskey Park; Vincent Wynn II—PR Executive for weakenwarfareATL.com; and Duane Kulers—Cook at Empire State South.

Drinks with Michael Collins Whiskey were made and handcrafted specifically for this event, created by bartender Omar Ferrer of Empire State South—arguably, the hardest worker of the night.

For the first one hundred guests, complimentary limited edition pocket squares were available made by Trio Tailoring. Eidé’s own publisher, Ciera Tavana, sported a custom made Trio jacket.

The event was a huge success and Eidé’s most dapper event to date! Be sure to look at the Suitable Man Event photo album on Eidé’s Facebook page for more pictures of the Suitable Man event.

The Suitable Man

You Can Always Go Downtown

According to the 2010 Census, for the first time in decades, metropolitan areas have grown all across the country. Between 2000 and 2010, there have been huge increases in residents in and around downtown areas. Cities with a  population of more than 5 million saw a 13 percent growth rate of areas within two miles of city hall (where, for all intents and purposes, is the central downtown area of a city). The total metropolitan area population was at 258 million in 2010, and 16.1 million of these residents lived within 2 miles of the city hall. And 21 percent of America’s total metro population—54 million people—live within 4 miles of city hall.

All this data does not mean to conclude that people aren’t still moving into suburbs and away from metro areas. Some cities like New Orleans and Baltimore saw a decrease of up to 30% in there metropolitan populations.

But for now, and for the first time in a while, it seems like we’re moving back to central city. Hello urban renewal.

—Jeffrey Preis

Tune Up Your Fixie for Atlanta Streets Alive

By Jaime Lin Weinstein

Atlanta Streets AliveAtlanta Streets Alive returns to our traffic-laden city this Sunday, October 7, temporarily halting automobile transportation along North Highland and Virginia Avenues from 2p.m. to 6p.m. to create a car-free community space where participants can “take to the streets” – literally.

Driven by the Atlanta Bicycle Coalition (no pun intended), the event is designed to  “encourage Atlanta to develop living streets — streets that appeal to pedestrians, bikers, businesses and neighbors.” While streets are publicly owned thoroughfares created for use by a variety of transportation means, they are, on a daily basis, overwhelmingly occupied by motor vehicles. On Sunday, people are invited to “reclaim” this 5-mile stretch (including two miles of the new Atlanta BeltLine Eastside Trail) and take advantage of the car-free environment to walk, bike, rollerblade, skateboard or participate in a slew of “human-powered” activities along the route including the physical: yoga, kickboxing, hula-hooping – and the cultural: a capella performances, marching bands, bicycle art displays.

Sunday marks Atlanta Streets Alive’s fifth event, the idea for which is credited to the city of Bogotá, Columbia where events centered around ciclovías (Spanish for “bike path”) have taken place since 1976. Today, certain main streets of Bogotá are blocked to traffic from 7a.m. to 2p.m. every Sunday, drawing over 800,000 people each week to run, walk, skate, cycle or partake in aerobics, yoga, and other various activities. Past Atlanta Streets Alive events have garnered an average of 3,400 attendees but this year’s goal is to attract at least 10,000 people to the streets, so come out this Sunday and show your support for creating safer, livable streets. More information (including an activity map) is available at http://www.atlantastreetsalive.com/.

You Can Always Go Downtown

According to the 2010 Census, for the first time in decades, metropolitan areas have grown all across the country. Between 2000 and 2010, there has been a huge increases in residents in and around downtown areas. Cities with a  population of more than 5 million saw a 13 percent growth rate of areas within two miles of city hall (where, for all intents and purposes, is the central downtown area of a city). The total metropolitan area population was at 258 million in 2010, and 16.1 million of these residents lived within 2 miles of the city hall. And 21 percent of America’s total metro population—54 million people—live within 4 miles of city hall.

All this data does not mean to conclude that people aren’t still moving into suburbs and away from metro areas. Some cities like New Orleans and Baltimore saw a decrease of up to 30% in there metropolitan populations.

But for now, and for the first time in a while, it seems like we’re moving back to central city. Hello urban renewal.

skylineJeffrey Preis